Ice wine has been around forever. The Germans have been making it for centuries and while eiswein as they call it, can be made whenever enough grapes freeze on the vine, even in cooler climate Germany, it doesn’t happen often or early enough to make it an every year treat.

 

What is ice wine — icewine?

Ice wine is – simply put – wine made from frozen grapes. With the advent of modern refrigeration, one could freeze grapes anywhere in the world, press and ferment them, and make ice wine. Though anyone interested in making a good or quality-driven icewine, those grapes are best when frozen on the vine.

 


In Canada
icewine is one word.


 

Read more about Canadian Icewine and its ageing potential at Culinaire Magazine. Find out why Icewine is expensive, why icewine is sold in small bottles, and Tom Firth’s tasting notes on each wine.

 

Tom Firth’s List of 8 Top Aged Canadian Icewine

(Note: These wines are generally no longer available for retail purchase)

 

Gehringer Brothers Minus 9 2009 Ehrenfelser Icewine

Okanagan Valley, BC

Sumac Ridge 2005 Gewürztraminer Icewine

Okanagan Valley, BC

Jackson-Triggs 2005 Proprietors Reserve Vidal Icewine

Niagara Peninsula, ON

Pillitteri Estates 2007 Vidal Icewine

Niagara Peninsula, ON

Summerhill Pyramid Winery 2004 Zweigelt

Okanagan Valley, BC

Magnotta 2007 Cabernet Franc Icewine

Niagara Escarpment, ON

Château des Charmes 2004 and 2007 Paul Bosc Vineyard Riesling Icewine

Niagara On The Lake, ON

Tinhorn Creek 2006 Kerner Icewine

Okanagan Valley, BC

Nk’Mip Cellars 2009 Qwam Qwmt Riesling Icewine

Okanagan Valley, BC

 

About Culinaire Magazine

Culinaire serves up features on dining in, dining out, wine, beer, spirits and cocktails. Culinaire is a food and beverage magazine tempting tastebuds, engaging appetites, and celebrating Alberta. We’re highlighting local people and learning from their experience and success. Sharing their secrets are chefs, sommeliers, brewers, mixologists, restaurateurs, and local food and beverage experts.

 

Check out Subverting the Usual Red Wine Suspects by Tom Firth